Nationals Season Preview – Part One, The Pitchers

Last season, the nation’s capital nearly saw something happen it hasn’t witnessed in a long time – someone breakeven.  That someone, or something, was the Washington Nationals, who by finishing 3rd in the standings posted their best finish ever in the National League East Division at 80-81 (one rain-postponed game against the Dodgers was never made up).  Not since their 81-81 inaugural season in 2005 have the Nationals come so close to a .500 finish, and last year they had Livan Hernandez soaking up 20 percent of the starts.  Thus, it was no surprise this off-season that GM Mike Rizzo’s major initiative was to upgrade the starting rotation, while shoring up one of baseball’s best bullpens.

While the consensus is that the Nationals lineup has holes, especially an inability to get men on base (more on that tomorrow), many pundits are still predicting that the Nationals will contend for a playoff spot on the basis of a retooled rotation and strong bullpen.  Let’s breakdown the pitching staff and whether it is truly playoff-caliber.

Starting Rotation

Stephen Strasburg – After making only 5 September starts post-Tommy John surgery, there is still a lot of mystery surrounding how Strasburg 2.0 will fare.  Does his velocity reportedly being down a tick matter?  How quickly will he recover his pin point control, which usually is a short-term casualty of the surgery?  And will he recover his ability to induce ground balls at close to a 50 percent clip (it was near 40 percent last season, albeit in a very small sample).  Despite these unknowns, the safe money is still on a sub-3 ERA, even with several bumps along the way.

Jordan Zimmermann – The second member of Washington’s Tommy John club, it is not unreasonable to think that Zimmermann may be the best pitcher on the staff this year.  He possesses four plus or near-plus pitches and impeccable control; if he can just bump up the strikeout rate a tad, there doesn’t appear to be much between Zimmermann and elite status.

Gio Gonzalez – While I suspect that the Nationals overpaid for Gio, I think a move to the National League will help to continue to mask some of his warts (cough, walks way too many, cough).  And while undoubtedly he represents an upgrade, I expect Gio’s ERA to be closer to 3.8 than 3 this year, which will leave many more sharing my suspicions at the end of the season.

Edwin Jackson – He looks almost every part the front-line ace he was supposed to blossom into all those years ago in LA.  But he has settled into who he is, which is a strong #4, decent #3 starter, who eats innings with the promise of a sub-3 ERA but rarely the results because he is a bit too hittable and a bit too generous with the free passes.  However, since the Nationals are slotting him in as their fourth starter, at $10 million this season, DC has seen plenty greater wastes of money.

John Lannan/Chien-Ming Wang – The final spot in the rotation ostensibly belongs to Wang, but since Wang’s constitution is about as strong as Carl Pavano’s manhood (I keep my promises), Lannan will start the season in his place.  Both are about as exciting as a bologna sandwich, but since two sandwiches are better than one, the only way you can hate on this combo for less than a combined 12 wins is if you hate America.

The Bullpen

Drew Storen – There is little doubt that Storen is an elite closer.  Drew’s slider makes right-handed hitters buckle and cry like John Kruk ordering cake.  But his tender elbow makes me worry that the Washington Tommy John Club Card is going to get another hole punched.  And if that happens, the status of the bullpen’s excellence will come very much into question.

Tyler Clippard – At some point, probably this season, Clippard is due for a bit of regression.  He’s good, but not quite sub-2 ERA good.  Plus, he’s been ridden more than Seattle Slew the past 2 years, which makes me worry (hey, I’m an auditor) about his ability to remain on the mound and effective, which is so vital to the Nationals season this year.

The Rest – One of the best things about the Nationals pitching staff this year is the depth of their bullpen.  With the addition of Brad Lidge joining the likes of Sean Burnett, Henry Rodriguez, and Ross Detwiler, the Nationals have a very strong mix of righties and lefties, short and long-men who can bring a lot of peace to a manager’s mind.  And there is even bigger upside if we all just close our eyes and click our heels three times…

If (and it is a big one) Rodriguez could ever find a bit more control, he and his triple-digit heat would quickly vault to near-elite status.  If Burnett can bump his k rate back up close to 1K/IP, the Nationals could well lock down left-hander batters.  And if Detwiler can continue to claw his way back to his first-round draft promise, the Nats would possess the league’s best swing-man and an obvious upgrade to the bologna sandwich combo.

While expecting all or even one of these wishes to come true is foolish, even without the leaps, it is fair to expect this bullpen to be one of the reasons the Nationals have a decent shot at a playoff spot.

Overall Assessment

To realistically compete for the NL East crown or a wild-card spot, the Nationals will have to make at least an 8 win improvement on last season.  And despite all the preseason optimism, that’s not going to be easy.  The good thing is that the pitching staff appears to be talented enough, and perhaps more importantly, deep enough, to carry out their end of the bargain.  I’m realistic enough to expect that at least one of the arms the Nationals will be counting on will not nearly live up to expectations (Storen and his sore elbow and Gio and his penchant for free passes come to mind).  However, strictly on the basis of the pitching staff, the Nationals do appear poised to make a run at the playoffs.  Will the rest of the team make that run a successful one?  Find out tomorrow as we preview the hitters and make a final prediction for the season.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s