Tagged: Phillies

Shaky as you go

It is cliché to say that a win is a win.  Except, as with all clichés, it’s true and for good reason after last night the Nationals tried to close out the series opener against Filthadelphia Charlie Sheen style.  Winning!  Just barely.

Game ball(s):  Gio Gonzalez and Ian Desmond.  Gio shut out the Phillies for six innings, mowing down nine in the process.  And Ian supplied all the offense the Nats would need with his solo home run in the top of the second and RBI single in the top of the fourth.  I’m proud to say that at the first quarter poll of the season, both players are making a mockery of some of my preseason concerns regarding them.  Keep poking me like the Snuggle Bear boys!

Goat(s):  Henry Rodriguez.  I’ve been a supporter of the wild flamethrower since the beginning, but it has become apparent that his inability to throw strikes is a real impediment to H-Rod effectively closing out games.  It’s a shame because he has an electric arm, but a team wishing to contend simply can’t have him taking the mound in the ninth unless he has a better clue where the ball will go leaving his hand.

Bryce Harper is still only 19:  Sean Burnett.  Craig Stammen was rock-solid again for two innings, but after H-Rod made a mess of the bottom of the ninth, Burnett stepped in and closed off the wound before it become fatal.

Current Record:  25-17

Nationals Season Preview – Part Two, The Hitters & Forecast

In Part One of the season preview, we focused on the Nationals pitching staff, broke down their prospects for the coming season, and remarked on the now suspicious injury history of Carl Pavano (okay, we didn’t, but it certainly does deserve the people’s eyebrow).  Today, we turn our punditry towards the Nationals lineup and bench, and then will make overly generic predictions for the season that in 400 years’ time, will also be seen to contain clues about the end of time.

Lineup

SS Ian Desmond – I probably should check with the judge to see if I’m allowed to write anything about Ian after drafting him last year in fantasy baseball, but it goes without saying that Desmond is hardly the ideal lead-off man.  He does possess a little pop and can steal 20 bags in a season, but whiffs way too much, doesn’t take a walk, and thus, doesn’t find his way to first and beyond too often (career .304 on-base percentage).  I hate to say this, but if Desmond and Espinosa hit most or all of the season at the top of the lineup, the hopes for a good Nationals offense goes out the window.

2nd Danny Espinosa – Well, I drafted you this year, which probably means we won’t be speaking by mid-May.  You are talented enough to make many things possible.  You have some real thunder in your bat, and a 20-20 season wouldn’t surprise me in the least.  But you strike out by the bushel, so a batting average above .250 may be asking too much.

3rd Ryan Zimmerman – I fear he won’t age well, but for now, Zimm is the Nat’s franchise player.  He is capable of a .300/30/100 (the latter of which he will probably will be denied because of the lack of base runners) season, all the while bringing gold glove defense to the hot corner every day.  I think Baseball Prospectus may have been stretching it just a bit when it said to look to Zimm for a dark horse MVP candidate, but not by that much.

RF Jayson Werth – The good thing is that Werth probably can’t play much worse than last year.  I suspect he is due for a decent rebound.  Then again, I didn’t think Dana Stubblefield could make a sumo wrestler jealous and he did.  That’s life as a Washington sports fan.  I actually think it would be best if manager Davey Johnson moved Werth and his career .360 on-base percentage up to the #2 hole, which would work the opponent’s pitchers a bit more and increase the odds that Zimm hits with someone on base.  That still wouldn’t solve lead-off, but you have to start somewhere.

LF Michael Morse – The breakout slugger from last season hasn’t done much of anything this Spring, hampered by a right lat strain that has lingered to the point of landing him on the 15-day DL to start the season.  I think he got a touch lucky with his batting average last year, but the power is legit.  Hopefully, his body holds up because it is bat that makes his butchery in the outfield (-7.9 UZR in 2011) tolerable.

1B Adam LaRoche – Oy.  I’m not sure I like the addition of last year’s season-ending shoulder surgery to an already slow and elongated swing susceptible to long periods of wind-only production.  Oh, and his shoulder has hurt him throwing during Spring Training.  Hopefully, he hasn’t lost his ability to pick it at first, because that may be the only thing keeping him from the scrap heap.

C Wilson Ramos – Wilson’s emergence last year probably contributed to the Nationals willingness to give up Derek Norris as part of the Gio Gonzalez trade.  Can’t say I disagree with at least that part of the trade, because a prospect is only good to you playing in the big leagues or as trade bait.  And with Ramos in DC, the former wasn’t going to happen.  Ramos has a nice bat capable of a solid average (think .270ish) and good power for a catcher (think optimistically 18 home runs or so), all the while playing solid defense.  He’s the Ron Popeil of catchers.  Set him and forget him.

CF Rick Ankiel/Roger Bernandina – Bleh.  Honestly, it won’t be until Bryce Harper is promoted from Triple A that the Nationals will have the hope of fielding a legitimate center fielder.  And of course, Harper offers more than just legitimacy beyond 2012 – true star potential.  Until then, the combination of Ankiel (who will start the season on the 15 day DL with a tight left quad) and Bernandina will offer up only average defense and below average hitting.  Bleh.

Bench

Having a deep and flexible bench is always a critical ingredient to a playoff-caliber team, and with a couple of injuries to start the season, it won’t take too terribly long to figure out how good the Nationals bench will be.  Right now, it looks like Washington will initially carry backup catcher Jesus Flores, infielders Chad Tracy and Steve Lombardozzi, outfielder Brett Carroll, and jacks of all trades, Xavier Nady and Mark DeRosa, the latter who should see most of the starts in place of the injured Morse.  At first blush, Washington appears to have a flexible but not necessarily overly talented bench.  Finding a decent left-handed bat (Tracy isn’t it) and keeping DeRosa healthy should be the Nats top bench priorities.

The Forecast

The end is nigh!  Oh, right, about the upcoming season.  As it stands now, the NL East, while seemingly stacked, also has its vulnerabilities.  The Phillies lineup is banged up and will actually be fairly pedestrian when it is all said and done.  The Braves didn’t do much to improve a middling lineup and will rely too much on young starters that will end up taxing their good, but overworked bullpen.  And the Marlins* rotation and bullpen beyond Heath Bell have a lot of question marks.  So, do all these weaknesses crack open the door to a Nationals playoff appearance?

My heart says yes but my mind still can’t get all the way there.  Stupid brain keeps asking questions like who in the heck is going to be on base when Zimm comes up to bat?  Will the holes in the Nationals defense (Morse, Desmond, CF) cost them one too many wins?  And the answers, to the extent they exist, are not satisfying enough to make me believe the Nationals will get all the way there.  They will get close.  Oh so close.  But they will fall just short – 87 W, 75 L, 3rd place in the NL East.

*The Bernie Madoff Mets have Mike Pelfrey in their rotation.  Your kid sister could hit .250 against him.  They aren’t competing for a playoff spot.

Insult to Injury

In and of itself, there is no shame in the Nationals losing 6-4 to the Brewers today as they are the hottest team in baseball, winning 13 of their last 16. Getting swept? That’s little harder to explain away, but again, sometimes you just run into a buzzsaw. Getting swept while the winning pitcher in the clincher strikes out 10 and hits the go-ahead home run? That’s rough.

But that’s exactly what Zack Greinke did to the Nationals today, sending them to their seventh loss in eight tries on the now completed road trip. The offense continues to plod along as the pitching staff has begun in earnest the regression to their below-average mean. Thankfully, the Nationals welcome the light-hitting Padres to Nationals Park on Friday for a three game series, a respite before the Ike Turner beatings begin anew with the Phillies swooping in on Monday.

Game ball(s): Greinke. He managed to humiliate Washington this afternoon, which is saying something for the nation’s capital.

Goat(s): Like Congress, you don’t suddenly find yourself in a ditch without a full team effort.

Bryce Harper is a long ways off: Mike Morse. Pressed into action with LaRoche mercifully going on the DL, he delivered his third homer in three days with a predictable MM line: 1 for 4 with 3 Ks.

Current Record: 21-28

Scratching and Clawing

Last evening, before the start of the Nationals series opener against the Florida Marlins, I happened to come across this nugget buried at the bottom of Jon Heyman’s latest column:

           Perhaps the Nationals ought to consider locking up manager Jim
           Riggleman. Washington has stayed afloat without its best pitcher
          (Stephen Strasburg) or best position player (Ryan Zimmerman).
          Kudos to Riggleman.

As if on cue, the Nationals then went and gutted out a 3-2 extra innings victory over the Marlins, despite whiffing an incredible 15 times.

I’m not going to pretend that it was all pretty to watch. It certainly wasn’t. But coming off a sweep at the hands of the Phillies, the Nationals needed a victory in the worse way, and got it thanks to a dominating relief effort from Tyler Clippard, yeoman’s work to plate the winning run in the top of the tenth, and a little Harry Houdini from Drew Storen and Sean Burnett to close out the game.

Lately, I have wondered how the Nationals can be expected to win games with an offense demonstrably missing its best piece (the Nationals are currently next to last in batting average in baseball, hitting only .226) and other critical pieces either struggling and/or hurt (LaRoche) or just plain struggling (Desmond and Espinosa). Well, we saw how last night, with a scrappy offensive effort and another superlative effort from the Nationals pitching staff.

As Riggleman said after the game, “We kept scratching and clawing.” 

Game 32 Natties

Game ball(s): Tyler Clippard. Two innings. Six batters. Six strikeouts. Wow.

Goat(s): John Buck. The Marlins catcher missed a sign while on third in the bottom of the fifth on a non-bunt by Ricky Nolasco, resulting in Buck, and potentially the winning run, getting tagged out in a rundown.

Bryce Harper is a ways off: Jordan Zimmermann. Another sign of life from Zimmermann, whose six strikeouts represented a season high. Still waiting for a breakout performance, but maybe the increasing whiffs are a sign it is near.

Current Record: 15-17

I do for the good things

Hmmmm. So there is a God. I guess George Costanza was only half right.

Last night, the Matt Stairs hitting cleanup Nationals took down the mighty Phillies 7-4, powered by former Philly Jason Werth and up and coming catcher Wilson Ramos. I didn’t think more sarcasm was the key, but whose to argue? On to the Natties:

Game ball(s): Jason Werth and Wilson Ramos, who were a combined 4 for 6, with 4 runs scored, 3 runs batted in, a homer, a steal, and 2 walks, for kicks and giggles.

Goat(s): Ian Desmond not sniffing first base once again.

Bryce Harper is a ways off: Sean Burnett. It wasn’t quite as clean as his first two saves, but he got the job done.

Current Record: 5-5