Tagged: Stephen Strasburg

Not So Smooth

Boy, am I glad that fool Terry Collins left Johan Santana, fresh off of major shoulder surgery, in to throw 134 pitches during his June 1st no-hitter.  You don’t need to consult Stephen Hawking to figure that his season had nowhere to go but down from there, which it has, with a 13.50 ERA in July and 19.89 ERA in August.  Wait.  What is that?  Some blogger in Tallahassee said back in June that people shouldn’t get their shorts in a bunch over a manager allowing a pitcher to do what he is supposed to do?  Ahem.  What can I say?  The Nats had just shut out the Braves 2-0 behind seven superlative innings from Stephen Strasburg, so I was liable to say and do anything.  Maybe that’s when I also bought the Robo Stir.  Well, at least the yoke of having to stir my own food has finally be removed from around my neck!

Game ball(s):  Mike Morse.  He only got one hit on the night, but he made it count, launching a grand slam off of Santana which staked the Nats to a 4-2 lead which they never surrendered.

Goat(s):  Chipper Jones.  I know.  Larry plays on the Braves and that’s not who the Nationals were playing last night.  But he smashed another home run last night in Atlanta’s 4-3 extra-innings win over the Dodgers, making it three home runs in the last two games.  Oh, and he is hitting .313 at the Geritol contemplation age of 40 and the Braves keep winning.  Anytime now you can begin to break up like the Titanic.

Bryce Harper is still only 19:  Bryce Harper. His 2 for 3 night with a home run and 2 RBIs was quite the welcome sight, as he’s batted only .183 since the All-Star break.  And that includes last night’s hopeful slump-buster effort.

Current Record:  74-45

Wednesday’s Quick Hits

It is just past 6:30pm on the east coast, the Nationals are up on the San Francisco Giants, and I may actually be awake to see the end.  I guess G.K. Chesterton was right when he said that the most incredible thing about miracles is that they happen.  Anyhoo, enough about my old-man struggles at the tender age of 33.  Let’s roll out a Wednesday edition of quick hits:

  • Sure, Madison Bumgarner throttled the Nats lineup last night, and Brandon Belt did most of the damage at the plate.  But like Harry Reid, facts be damned. I knew given how well Washington has been playing, the Giants must have been cheating.  And well, what do we have here: Giants OF Cabrera suspended for positive drug test.  Amateur hour at the comedy club aside, this news shouldn’t really come as a complete shock to any baseball fan.  The fact that Melky Cabrera, Melky Cabrera was being talked about as a possible National League MVP candidate, on the heels of last year’s breakout season that also came out of the blue, should have been so brazen a sign that even a Kardashian would have blushed using it.  I guess it is just as true today as it has always been.  If it is too good to be true, it probably is.
  • I know.  Just what you want to read more about.  Stephen Strasburg and the great innings watch.  Please God let me read more about what Kate Middleton (erm, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge) wore to the closing ceremonies of the Olympics!  Anything but Strasburg and pitch counts!  But I must.  From Will Carroll of SI.com, a writer I respect a lot for his coverage of medical issues, comes this great little blurb: Strasburg plan little better than educated guess. And again, the money quote:

All in all, lowered innings totals don’t automatically equal health, and similar pitchers have gone more innings without apparent issue. Without the benefit of data, the Nats (and the rest of these teams) are guessing. That’s not good enough.

Okay.  I’m done with beating the supposed dying arm of Strasburg.  Well, at least for tonight.

  • Oh, and I just finished watching Felix Hernandez pitch a perfect game against the Tampa Bay Rays.  Don’t worry, I’ve got the Nats on my computer.  Back to King Felix.  On days like today, he sure does wear that nickname well.  However, is it just me, or do the Rays seem to get a no-hit every two months?

Okay Sean Burnett.  Back-to-back hits allowed to the Giants in the bottom of the eighth.  Interesting strategy to hold on to the Nats four-run lead.  Like the Pence ground out.  More conventional.  I guess this is my sign to wrap this column up.

Pseudoscience & Stephen Strasburg

Fantastic column from Jeff Passan of Yahoo! Sports on the decision to shut down Stephen Strasburg next month:

Stephen Strasburg’s innings limit is not rooted in science, but Nationals believe it’s prudent

And for what it is worth, here is my take-away quote from the piece:

The most fascinating part of the Nationals plan to shut down Strasburg is that in spite of not knowing, they don’t care, either. The Nationals are potentially jeopardizing their fantastic 2012 season to do something that they have absolutely no idea will protect his arm from further damage. Rizzo has cited advice from medical experts, but in reality he’s hearing what’s convenient for him to hear, unless the Nationals know something the rest of the baseball world doesn’t.

I understand Mike Rizzo and the Nationals are in the position they are in because of the wrapped in a nappy environment pitchers have been raised in the last 20 years.  But perhaps even more dangerous than the assumption that shutting Strasburg down will protect him from future injury is the foolish belief that today’s wonderful success will necessarily translate to tomorrow and beyond.  A typical comment on the Strasburg dilemma I have come across scanning the blogs and message boards:

nats24
2:06 AM EDT

Nats fans have to get used to this: Stras will not be pitching in playoffs that, it looks increasingly likely the team will be in.
I look at it this way: If the Nats win it all without him, look out in ’14. A Washington dynasty? I like it.

Dynasty?  I would be as happy as a fat kid in a candy store if that were to be the case.  But we live in a dynamic world, where the game of baseball is played by fallible humans, and not widgets which can produce just the same tomorrow as they do today.  Sure, the lineup could continue to surge, and Jordan, Gio, Edwin (if he returns), Ross, and yes, Stephen, could pitch just as well next year and heck, maybe even better.  But maybe they won’t.  And I don’t want the Nationals to look back in 2017 without a World Series ring saying, “2012.  What might have been.”

They Keep Rolling Along

That’s what the Marlins broadcasters said at the end of this afternoon’s 4-1 victory over Miami, after Stephen Strasburg spun six strong shutout innings in leading the Nationals to a series victory.  Oh, and because the swordfish, and not the diva marlin, is his favorite large saltwater fish, he threw in a two-run single for kicks and giggles.  Keep rolling along!

Game ball(s):  Strasburg.  After his two-RBI single in the bottom of the second, Carlos Lee was overheard saying to Stephen at first, “.363.  You’re batting .363?  I tell all the ladies I weigh 363.  Sigh.”

Goat(s):  Ricky Nolasco.  Stat-heads (and yes, I am oftentimes one) have said for years that Nolasco is a better pitcher than his numbers have shown.  He has gotten unlucky, they say.  Well, either God has a sick sense of humor, or it is just the case that Nolasco is just not that good of a pitcher.  When reached for comment, God said, “Nolasco pitches.  I laugh.”

Bryce Harper is still only 19:  Drew Storen.  With Tyler Clippard needing a day off after making appearances the last three days, Storen came in with a three-run lead and shut the door on his first save of the season.  He hung a few pitches, but all in all, looked pretty good for only his ninth game of the season.

Current Record:  65-43

Tuesday Quick Hits

It’s raining cats and dogs* this afternoon in Tallahassee, so what better excuse to stay indoors and bang out another edition of Quick Hits.

  • Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports is reporting that the Nationals are exploring pitching options to potentially replace Stephen Strasburg, with Ryan Dempster among the names being mentioned.  And, according to Rosenthal, the Nats are also looking for an everyday catcher, with Ramon Hernandez of the Colorado Rockies being considered.  Let’s start with the latter possibility first.  If it’s Ramon Hernandez the Nats are looking at, put me down in the “move along” column.  I know Jesus Flores has had his struggles at the plate (.621 OPS) and I’m guessing Washington isn’t inclined to roll more with the rookie Jhonatan Solano.  But Hernandez, even with the help of the thin rocky mountain air, has a slightly lowers OPS (.620) and fielding metrics indicate that Flores is the superior defender to Hernandez.  You might rightly point out that Hernandez has been banged up this season with a wrist injury, which has masked his offensive superiority.  It’s true that Hernandez’s career .747 OPS is better than Flores’ .682 mark.  However, did I mention that Hernandez is coming off a wrist injury that typically saps offensive output?  Move along.
  • Since this is “Quick Hits”, I figured I should bump the whole Stephen Strasburg shutdown watch to a second bullet.  And actually, the topic probably deserves a whole column.  But that wouldn’t necessarily be quick, now would it?  Stop wasting words smarty pants.  By almost all media accounts, it is just a matter of when and not if the Nats will shut down Strasburg this season.  Whether it is at 160 innings or some other point, it appears that at least publicly, Nats management is saying that health will come before everything else and Strasburg will be told his season is over before the season is actually over.  Now, I don’t know what will actually happen come September, with the possibility of a World Series run on Washington’s horizon.  It is very easy to say in mid-July that you will put down one of your bayonets when the other side comes charging in September for fear of breaking it.  But for the life of me, I still cannot understand baseball’s obsession with protecting pitchers with artificial innings limits and pitch counts, the value of which is based on dubious or non-existent evidence.  For all the limits and restrictions put in place by teams the last 20 or 30 years, has there been an appreciable decline in pitching injuries?  Maybe shutting Strasburg down is the right thing to do to ensure that he is there to take the mound for the next 10-12 years.  But wasn’t management saying the very same thing in 2010 when he wasn’t allowed to throw more than 100 pitches in a game?  How did that work out?
  • One final thing on the whole Strasburg shutdown.  If the Nats do decide to park him in September, I’m not sure they are, or should be, in the position to mortgage even more of their farm system on getting someone like Dempster, who isn’t controlled beyond this season.  GM Mike Rizzo has been adamant that any moves made would be done with an eye towards upgrading for the long-haul, and not just this season.  I hope he sticks with this philosophy, because if they want to make a move that gives the team the greatest possibility of winning this season, it would be to find a way to keep Strasburg pitching while not further depleting their farm.
  • Finally, in addition to being a rabid Nats fan, I’m even a more die-hard Washington Redskins fan.  I know.  Counseling helps some.  And so it is that even the Redskins can find a way to screw up the start of RG III’s career: Griffin III again misses Redskins rookie camp. Thank you Nats for winning. It eases some of the pain.

*Cooley the dog would like to note for the record that it is not literally raining dogs, though he is intrigued at the possibility of a rain shower of cats.  Manna from heaven.

June’s MESPYs

I’m in a celebratory mood this morning.  The Nationals rolled off another win last night, and in the process, put another curly w in the box score for Jordan Zimmermann.  Baseball is a funny, funny game. Zimm goes winless between late May and late June and now sees superlative pitching being rewarded in his last two starts, with the Nats offense knocking in 20 runs combined.  And of course, it’s our nation’s Independence Day, and while I still have time to write without IRS compulsion, what better way to celebrate than with June’s MESPY (Matt’s Excellence in Self-Promotion Yada Yada) Awards:

AL MVP:  Mike Trout.  Robinson Cano had a monster June, but on the day we celebrate standing up to the big bully on the block (alliteration!), I’m not going to shirk away from my disdain for the Evil Empire.  So it goes to Trout, who actually edged Cano out in WAR (Wins Above Replacement), 2.2 to 2.0.  And Trout did this at the tender age of 20.  Wow.

AL CY Young:  Hiroki Kuroda.  Dang.  Well, the British did give us the Beatles.

AL Rookie of the Month:  Trout.  I hate to be a Benedict Arnold on such a hallowed day, but what I said in May’s MESPYs hasn’t changed.  Trout has been baseball’s best rookie and at this pace, could be in the running for the AL’s best player by season’s end.

NL MVP:  R.A. Dickey.  Andrew McCutchen and Joey Votto both deserve kudos for tremendous months, but Dickey taking home the award just goes to show you how dominate he was during June.  He posted the second best WAR in baseball (2.1), a sub-one ERA (.93), a .60 WHIP, struck out 55 batters while only walking 8, and went 5-0.  Oh, and he did this throwing a knuckleball.

NY CY Young:  Dickey.  If only I had a Forever Lazy this would be the perfect day.

NL Rookie of the Month:  Andrelton Simmons.  Bryce, I still want to be your accountant.  But while you hit a bit of a soft patch in June, the Braves shortstop batted .333, showed slick fielding skills (alliteration!), and posted a nice 1.6 WAR.  I’m going to take a long walk off a short bridge now.

Nationals’ MVP:  Ian Desmond.  He crushed another one out last night off of Tim Lincecum, which was just more of the same for the Nats’ All-Star shortstop.  I’d like to think this is all because of my talk with Ian at Spring Training two years ago.  Oh, but he didn’t do so well last year.  I see.  My silence is golden.

Nationals’ CY Young:  Stephen Strasburg.  A 2.25 xFIP (Expected Fielding Independent Pitching) points to his 3.09 June ERA being unlucky.  But a 13.37 k/9 and six quality starts demonstrate that even without luck, Strasburg is simply dominant.

Nationals’ Rookie of the Month:  Tyler Moore.  I can see why I got into auditing and not public relations.  That depressing thought aside, in 68 fewer plate appearances, Moore had the same number of home runs as Bryce Harper (4), same number of RBIs (11), batted a robust .425, and topped Harper in WAR 1.0 to 0.6.  I hate myself.

And that’s all folks!

Monday’s Quick Hits

With the Nationals off tonight (there is no truth to the rumor that in a sweaty act of desperation, the Nats offered to play the Giants in San Francisco), I figured it was time for another edition of quick hits:

  • First things first.  Congratulations are in order for Washington’s All-Star game representatives, Stephen Strasburg, Gio Gonzalez, and Ian Desmond.  It is only fitting that the Nationals landed two starting pitchers on the squad, given the dominance of their starting five through the first half of the season.  And Desmond’s selection by manager Tony LaRussa was a very nice surprise.  Given some of the putrid selections in both leagues, it was good to see a player not among the fan’s top eight shortstops get selected, as Desmond has been among the NL’s best shortstops.
  • Now what to do about Bryce Harper being on the final five-man All-Star ballot? He says that he’d vote for Chipper Jones.  For still basically being a kid, he is handling this moment with class.  The most interesting thing about all of this is how MLB leaves so much about a glorified exhibition game they’ve made mean so much up to things like a fan vote.  And that’s why, while I applaud the kid’s reverence, I actually think Chipper would be the last guy I would vote for.  If possible home field advantage is on the line, unless 28 year-old Larry is walking through the tunnel, I would rather take a chance on the kid.  Think about that while you go vote here.
  • I am bit of a stathead so this was pleasing to my senses: Nationals second in SI.com/FanGraphs Power Poll.
  • And a fond farewell to one of baseball’s greatest joys of the early and mid-2000’s, as Dontrelle Willis announced his retirement from baseball today.  Living in Florida, I’ve gotten to see a lot of Marlins games on television.  And there was a time when a Dontrelle Willis start was must-see tv, if only for the simple pleasure of watching the man smile on the mound.  He truly loved what he was doing and while the last few years he has been a wild shell of himself, for a brief moment, he was one of baseball’s better starters.